Nike LeBron 15 Low Performance Review

For years, the LeBron signature line lowtop model has released and immediately been looked over as a performance let-down — and for the most part, they were. However, the LeBron 15 Low has arrived, and for once, it just may be better than the original. Let’s ride…

The LeBron 15 Low uses the same cleat-like turf-gripping pattern that worked great going forward and back on the LeBron 15, with one minor change: the pattern is turned about 30-degrees, and that makes all the difference between a serviceable pattern and a really good pattern.

The LeBron 15 Low has good grip running and stopping going forward, but there is now noticeable stopping power while playing laterally. While trying to stay in front of my man on defense (gets harder every game) I had no issues with any slipping out or pushing off to change direction unless the court had hairballs and dust bunnies all over it — which is not uncommon at the three 24-Hour Fitness courts I play at. It’s amazing that this change in performance wasn’t noticed when developing the regular LeBron 15 but thankfully Nike got it right on the Low.

As for outdoor use, it’s possible. The rubber is thick and is a little harder in durometer than most on the market, but it is still softer than most outdoor-specific shoes you may be used to. The points and peaks will probably wear off and lose all bite within a few wears, but overall, the LeBron 15 Low may work fine for a few months.

While the LeBron 15 relied on the serious bounce and response of articulated Max Zoom, the LeBron 15 Low uses a 180-degree heel Curry 5 unit and an oval forefoot Zoom Air unit. The first thing that I noticed was a lower ride, which, as a guard who relies on whatever lateral quickness is left in the tank, was a welcome sight.

The high top was definitely springier and had better impact protection overall, but the LeBron 15 Low is nothing to laugh at. The forefoot Zoom is responsive and quick, as well as a feature that seems like a problem at first: the curved outsole. The Zoom unit is set behind the curve, which means that as you land the impact and response come at you first, then the foot rolls into the next step smoothly and toe-off feels natural. Some of the oval Zoom setups can feel stiff and slappy, but not the LeBron 15 Low.

The heel Air Max could have easily been the same Max Zoom as the high, and honestly, it should have been. There were a couple of times, when planting for jumpers or stopping on drives to change direction, that the heel unit rolled over on me. Instability on heel landings is a common problem when cushioning is too soft.

In one instance, I had a one-on-three break (no one ran with me) so I planted on the right wing to square up for a 3-point jumper. As I planted the outside (right) foot to square, the Air unit rolled and I didn’t get a clean jump, missing the shot. If I was a purely forefoot player this wouldn’t be an issue, but I’m not, so it was.

The materials used on the LeBron 15 Low are the same as what’s used on the high — Battleknit across the upper with Flywire lacing and a stretch knit collar. The knit is soft in all the right spots (around the tongue area, the midfoot) and stronger and tighter in the high stress areas around the forefoot and heel. There is a liner in those areas as well, so the true knit feeling isn’t there, but for an athlete like LeBron (or any heavy-footed or bigger player) the backing is necessary.

The ankle and tongue tabs are still a nice synthetic leather (some colors may use real leather) and add a touch of luxury to a ball shoe. The Flywire does actually work and you can feel it pull the upper around the foot. Honestly, that’s about it — the shoe has a simple construction and a good look.

The fit on the high was debatable — I have a pair in both my true size 10.5 and a half down to a 10. The 10 is definitely more form-fitting, but the 10.5 doesn’t kill me with extra space either. On the LeBron 15 Low it’s the same; I went with my true 10.5 but felt like a 10 would work also. Again, the room in the 10.5 isn’t an issue when playing, but you feel more of the knit-stretch and the hug of the shoe in the smaller size.

The LeBron 15 Low does a fantastic job with heel lockdown, something lows have had an issue with for years. The knit collar, internal counter, and heel padding allow no movement — especially when laced tight for playing. The Flywire pulls the foot back into the heel and the high heel tab, with thick padding, locks it down.

The lacing system is actually the same one used in the high top, which shows the high was really a LeBron 15 Low in disguise (we all knew that though, right?). As for wide footers, most should be fine. I am slightly-wide but not enough to size up in most shoes. The LeBron 15 Low allows a little stretch around the foot but if you are extremely wide you may need a half up or to try these on.

On the high top version lateral stability was a little…off. Most knew it was due to the high-riding midsole with an uncaged cushioning system (no stiffer foam surrounding the softer padding). The solution in most of the public’s eyes was to add an outrigger. Guess what? The LeBron 15 Low has an outrigger — and it is better.

More than the outrigger, though, the midsole foam provides a stiffer, lower ride, which naturally leads to a more controlled system. Don’t get me wrong — the outrigger helps, but the foam is the bigger plus. This would normally mean the cushioning is sacrificed, but as we covered above, the forefoot Zoom still provides responsive bounce and a smooth ride.

The heel area is hoop jordan and if any cushion can be considered unstable, this is it. To put Air Max on a knitted low makes the ride questionable to start. Fortunately, the heel lockdown is better than the previous LeBron lows that used the Max heel, so even though the unit is soft on the edges, the heel lockdown takes away most of the insecurity while playing.

Even so, there were times I would come off a screen and feel my foot roll over the Max unit — not to the point of injury, but enough that I either had to gather and then jump or I didn’t get fully squared around on my jump, missing the shot. Driving the lane was also fine going straight in, but if a hard plant laterally led into a jump, a roll could be felt — but not every time. It was frustrating because if it happened every time the LeBron 15 Low would be easy to throw in the closet. Most of the time, it’s great, so the shoe is fun to wear. Then, you feel it, and want to give up.

The LeBron 15 Low is such an improvement over the past years’ lowtop models that it really isn’t fair to compare them. The last five years have felt like the low was just to say there was one — and so you could have an LBJ logo on your summer shoe.

The LeBron 15 Low feels like a game shoe, an actual design for playing that is close to the normal shoe but just different enough to warrant a new release. The shoe feels more guard-oriented, with a lower ride and stiffer cushioning for a fast game — especially with the curved forefoot and the transition it provides. If you are a lighter player that never bought LeBron’s because of the boot-like fit and feel, here you go. Even for heavier players that didn’t like the higher midsole, the LeBron 15 Low is a find.

The first three models of the LeBron line had lows that were completely playable and looked promising for summers, but with the rise of the LeBron Soldier line the performance of the lows went by the wayside. With the LeBron 15 Low performance returns — and the summer may be a little hotter, at least on-foot.

Nike LeBron 15 Low Performance Review

For years, the LeBron signature line lowtop model has released and immediately been looked over as a performance let-down — and for the most part, they were. However, the LeBron 15 Low has arrived, and for once, it just may be better than the original. Let’s ride…

The LeBron 15 Low uses the same cleat-like turf-gripping pattern that worked great going forward and back on the LeBron 15, with one minor change: the pattern is turned about 30-degrees, and that makes all the difference between a serviceable pattern and a really good pattern.

The LeBron 15 Low has good grip running and stopping going forward, but there is now noticeable stopping power while playing laterally. While trying to stay in front of my man on defense (gets harder every game) I had no issues with any slipping out or pushing off to change direction unless the court had hairballs and dust bunnies all over it — which is not uncommon at the three 24-Hour Fitness courts I play at. It’s amazing that this change in performance wasn’t noticed when developing the regular LeBron 15 but thankfully Nike got it right on the Low.

As for outdoor use, it’s possible. The rubber is thick and is a little harder in durometer than most on the market, but it is still softer than most outdoor-specific shoes you may be used to. The points and peaks will probably wear off and lose all bite within a few wears, but overall, the LeBron 15 Low may work fine for a few months.

While the LeBron 15 relied on the serious bounce and response of articulated Max Zoom, the LeBron 15 Low uses a 180-degree heel Curry 5 unit and an oval forefoot Zoom Air unit. The first thing that I noticed was a lower ride, which, as a guard who relies on whatever lateral quickness is left in the tank, was a welcome sight.

The high top was definitely springier and had better impact protection overall, but the LeBron 15 Low is nothing to laugh at. The forefoot Zoom is responsive and quick, as well as a feature that seems like a problem at first: the curved outsole. The Zoom unit is set behind the curve, which means that as you land the impact and response come at you first, then the foot rolls into the next step smoothly and toe-off feels natural. Some of the oval Zoom setups can feel stiff and slappy, but not the LeBron 15 Low.

The heel Air Max could have easily been the same Max Zoom as the high, and honestly, it should have been. There were a couple of times, when planting for jumpers or stopping on drives to change direction, that the heel unit rolled over on me. Instability on heel landings is a common problem when cushioning is too soft.

In one instance, I had a one-on-three break (no one ran with me) so I planted on the right wing to square up for a 3-point jumper. As I planted the outside (right) foot to square, the Air unit rolled and I didn’t get a clean jump, missing the shot. If I was a purely forefoot player this wouldn’t be an issue, but I’m not, so it was.

The materials used on the LeBron 15 Low are the same as what’s used on the high — Battleknit across the upper with Flywire lacing and a stretch knit collar. The knit is soft in all the right spots (around the tongue area, the midfoot) and stronger and tighter in the high stress areas around the forefoot and heel. There is a liner in those areas as well, so the true knit feeling isn’t there, but for an athlete like LeBron (or any heavy-footed or bigger player) the backing is necessary.

The ankle and tongue tabs are still a nice synthetic leather (some colors may use real leather) and add a touch of luxury to a ball shoe. The Flywire does actually work and you can feel it pull the upper around the foot. Honestly, that’s about it — the shoe has a simple construction and a good look.

The fit on the high was debatable — I have a pair in both my true size 10.5 and a half down to a 10. The 10 is definitely more form-fitting, but the 10.5 doesn’t kill me with extra space either. On the LeBron 15 Low it’s the same; I went with my true 10.5 but felt like a 10 would work also. Again, the room in the 10.5 isn’t an issue when playing, but you feel more of the knit-stretch and the hug of the shoe in the smaller size.

The LeBron 15 Low does a fantastic job with heel lockdown, something lows have had an issue with for years. The knit collar, internal counter, and heel padding allow no movement — especially when laced tight for playing. The Flywire pulls the foot back into the heel and the high heel tab, with thick padding, locks it down.

The lacing system is actually the same one used in the high top, which shows the high was really a LeBron 15 Low in disguise (we all knew that though, right?). As for wide footers, most should be fine. I am slightly-wide but not enough to size up in most shoes. The LeBron 15 Low allows a little stretch around the foot but if you are extremely wide you may need a half up or to try these on.

On the high top version lateral stability was a little…off. Most knew it was due to the high-riding midsole with an uncaged cushioning system (no stiffer foam surrounding the softer padding). The solution in most of the public’s eyes was to add an outrigger. Guess what? The LeBron 15 Low has an outrigger — and it is better.

More than the outrigger, though, the midsole foam provides a stiffer, lower ride, which naturally leads to a more controlled system. Don’t get me wrong — the outrigger helps, but the foam is the bigger plus. This would normally mean the cushioning is sacrificed, but as we covered above, the forefoot Zoom still provides responsive bounce and a smooth ride.

The heel area is hoop jordan and if any cushion can be considered unstable, this is it. To put Air Max on a knitted low makes the ride questionable to start. Fortunately, the heel lockdown is better than the previous LeBron lows that used the Max heel, so even though the unit is soft on the edges, the heel lockdown takes away most of the insecurity while playing.

Even so, there were times I would come off a screen and feel my foot roll over the Max unit — not to the point of injury, but enough that I either had to gather and then jump or I didn’t get fully squared around on my jump, missing the shot. Driving the lane was also fine going straight in, but if a hard plant laterally led into a jump, a roll could be felt — but not every time. It was frustrating because if it happened every time the LeBron 15 Low would be easy to throw in the closet. Most of the time, it’s great, so the shoe is fun to wear. Then, you feel it, and want to give up.

The LeBron 15 Low is such an improvement over the past years’ lowtop models that it really isn’t fair to compare them. The last five years have felt like the low was just to say there was one — and so you could have an LBJ logo on your summer shoe.

The LeBron 15 Low feels like a game shoe, an actual design for playing that is close to the normal shoe but just different enough to warrant a new release. The shoe feels more guard-oriented, with a lower ride and stiffer cushioning for a fast game — especially with the curved forefoot and the transition it provides. If you are a lighter player that never bought LeBron’s because of the boot-like fit and feel, here you go. Even for heavier players that didn’t like the higher midsole, the LeBron 15 Low is a find.

The first three models of the LeBron line had lows that were completely playable and looked promising for summers, but with the rise of the LeBron Soldier line the performance of the lows went by the wayside. With the LeBron 15 Low performance returns — and the summer may be a little hotter, at least on-foot.

Nike LeBron 15 Low Performance Test

The Nike LeBron 15 Low was much more impressive than the LeBron Lows of years past. Find out why with our performance review.
Traction on the Nike LeBron 15 Low isn’t too far from what was used on the original Nike LeBron 15, but it was tweaked enough to make a difference. While the protruding diamond traction pattern remains the same, it’s been implemented in a way that it almost moves in a nice circle along the outsole.

With the pattern moving in this way the shoe is able to handle lateral movements much better than the midtop version of the shoe. Dust isn’t a huge issue for the LeBron 15 in general, due to the pattern being more like spikes along the sole rather than your typical average pattern, but there were a few times that I’d stop and wipe just to get a little bit extra bite.

I did have a couple of slipping issues upon certain movements, but it was near the ball of the foot/toe-off area. This section slopes in an upward direction so I think the issue was that I was moving too fast to properly to allow the sloped section of the outsole make contact with the floor. I could be wrong, of course, but that’s what I feel was causing the issue because it wasn’t present in the LeBron 15 mid at all and the outsole there was pretty even in terms of court coverage.

Overall, I’d say this was a slight improvement over the mids, but not enough to change its score. Just know that you can be confident in the outsole’s ability to maintain grip, and that was while I was testing a pair with a translucent outsole. And just as an FYI, I wouldn’t recommend playing in the pairs with iridescent outsoles; those felt much more slick in-store than this Grey/Pink pair.
Cushion from the original LeBron 15 wasn’t carried over in any way, which I find unfortunate because the rear Air Max unit could have been a Max Zoom unit. Had it been Max Zoom I think the LeBron 15 Low would have been a bit more amazing than it already is.

While the heel area isn’t as dense feeling as Air Max units can feel, it still would have been awesome to have had something a bit more absorbent and bouncy underfoot. However, the Air Max unit in place is comfortable and I feel that it offers enough impact protection for small and large players alike.

The forefoot section does have Zoom Air, just more of the traditional variety, and I loved it. This, coupled with that weird upward sloping toe-off section, created a very fluid ride with a bit of spring to each step. While the Zoom Air is bottom-loaded, it doesn’t feel like it and the entire cushion setup reminded me of what we had gotten in the Nike LeBron 9 — only a bit more comfortable.

This setup does sit a bit higher off the ground than most guard shoes, but this shoe isn’t really for guards — although it can be. If you’re a smaller player that prefers to have something more substantial under your feet without feeling like you’re unstable or about to tip over upon movements and changes of direction then I think you’ll enjoy the LeBron 15 Low quite a bit. At least I know I did.

Materials are one aspect that hasn’t really changed between the mid and low versions of the Nike LeBron 15.

Battleknit is still the primary build and there doesn’t seem to be any real difference between models other than less material being used at the collar — something I was more than fine with since the collar of the LeBron 15 mid just felt useless to me. That shoe was nearly a low within the Battleknit build but was made to look higher cut than it actually was due to the stretchy knit riding so high over the ankle.

Much like my thoughts on the materials in the mid version of the shoe, I feel that most will enjoy the materials here. There are some areas that are glued, some areas that are stretchy, and some areas that are really thick. All-in-all, it’s a wonderful upper that fits and feels great on-foot. It’s also been durable; there are no real signs of wear, which some may appreciate.
I felt the LeBron 15 mid ran a little long, but the LeBron 15 Low fits me fine going true to size. There will be some that may want to go down 1/2 size (especially narrow footers), but for the most part true to size will work — even for wide footers.

Lockdown on the shoe is much like the mid. I found no issues from the collar to the forefoot. My heel always felt locked into place and there were no hot spots or pinching anywhere. After having issues with most of the more recent LeBron low tops, I’m happy to say that these gave me no problems at all.
Support in the LeBron 15 was a bit lackluster due to the tooling setup, but that has changed with the low top version. Traditional support features like a torsional midfoot shank and TPU heel counter are all in place and work well.

However, this time around the new midsole tooling setup gave the shoe a much needed outrigger for lateral support. This small addition to the shoe gave it the stability the mids lacked which only makes me wish the LeBron 15 Low had Max Zoom Air in the heel even more as that would have been such an awesome ride — much like the Nike KD 7 on hoop jordan.
While the Nike LeBron 15 was a great shoe for those that didn’t require a lot of lateral support and stability, the Nike LeBron 15 Low changes all of that to become a shoe that anyone can enjoy on court.

Traction was solid while and there was a great balance of cushion without the loss of any mobility — even for us smaller guys. On or off the court, I think the Nike LeBron 15 Low is a hit.

Nike is on a roll this year with models like the Kyrie 4 and PG 2. Now, you can now add the LeBron 15 Low to that list.

Nike Announces Kobe 1 Retro X Undefeated and Lebron X Kith

Nike has unveiled its Makers of the Game collection for All-Star and it is comprised of tons of releases. Two stood out: the Zoom Kobe 1 Protro x Undefeated and the second part of the LeBron 15 Kith collection.

Beginning February 15, these releases will begin dropping on 2018jordans.com and Nike SNKRS to celebrate the 2018 All-Star Game.

First, Nike and Kobe Bryant have partnered with historic LA boutique Undefeated. The team there reimagined the Zoom Kobe 1 Protro for the City of Angels. Expect this camo rendition of Kobe’s updated signature on February 15 for $175.

Second, Kith’s Ronnie Fieg is back with the second installment of his LeBron x Kith Long Live the King collection. This part of the collection will feature four footwear styles: a stunning white Nike LeBron 15 Lifestyle, a black and gold LeBron 15 Lifestyle, a white and floral LeBron 15 Performance, and a blacked out LeBron 15 Performance. Expect elevated pricing similar to the first part of the Kith collection. Matching apparel will flank the footwear pieces.

“Chapter 2 of Long Live the King was originally supposed to be our first release with Nike and LeBron,” Fieg wrote on Instagram. “But after seeing how incredible the product turned out I wanted to save it for the most impactful notch in our brand’s timeline yet. That moment is finally here after years in the making, and I can’t wait to share it with the world. Chapter 2 is a story of royalty, and is divided into 4 main palettes: City of Angels, King’s Cloak, King’s Crown, and Suit of Armor. The Chapter 2 Journal is now live via link in bio. P.S. I see you with that buzzer beater last night @kingjames hell of a way to kick off these next few days. Chapter 2.”

Sound off in the comments on which of one of these collaborative releases you’re most excited for.

CHECK OUT THE NIKE LEBRON 15 ‘BHM’ AND KD 10 ‘BHM’

Like the Air Jordan 1 Flyknit ‘BHM’, Nike is putting a special multicolor touch on two of its signature lines for Black History Month.

Nike is beefing up its Black History Month theme of black, red, and green (and a touch of gold) with two new colorways of the LeBron 15 and KD 10.

The sneakers and are rumored to be releasing in just a few days on January 15, which of course does not fall within Black History Month but is fitting nonetheless because it’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

The LeBron 15 ‘BHM’ features a Battleknit upper that weaves together red, green, and black. Underneath, everything from the heel counter, Zoom cushioning, and outsole is blacked out with one small exception (we’ll get to that later). Unfortunately, there were no premium touches given to the lacing and pull tabs that we can see — and no, these do not appear to carry those special outriggers we were hoping to see on retail units.

The KD 10 takes a different approach by using a black Flyknit base and adding red and green via the TPU reinforcements. It is overlayed with leather accents at the eyestays while black Swooshes are outlined with a nice gold touch. The midsole is predominately treated with white, but adds some color blocking towards the heel to fit in with the ‘BHM’ scheme atop visible Zoom and a solid white rubber outsole.

We are sure you noticed those gold dates featured on both silhouettes. These represent some special moments were both LeBron and KD took to the stage respectively.

The July 13, 2016, date on the LeBron 15 refers to the ESPY Awards of 2016 where LeBron joined his friends/fellow athletes Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony, and Chris Paul to create a profound moment with their statements.

The KD 10 BHM date of May 6, 2014, honors the crowning of Kevin Durant as the NBA’s Most Valuable Player. He gave a touching speech that seemed to highlight everyone on earth but himself (who could forget that touching moment he shared with his mother?).

There’s no official word yet on pricing or availability for these two pairs, but check back for updates as we will be sure to provide more information as it comes.

What do you think of the way Nike’s 2018 BHM Collection is shaping up? Which of the two shoes pictured here was executed better? Let us know in the comments below.

Nike LeBron 15 “Ashes” Performance Review

After weeks of testing, the Nike LeBron 15 Ashes Performance Review is here.

Traction was solid for the most part. You can feel the triangle pattern bite and grip the court really well from a linear standpoint. Unfortunately, laterally I can’t say the same. The way the pattern is implemented seems to be straight across the surface. If some portions of the pattern were turned a bit I feel lateral coverage would’ve had that same bite that it offers linearly.

While I did play in a pair (for a very short time) that featured clear soles, the court I had played on was one of the most pristine surfaces I’ve had the pleasure of encountering. To be safe, rather than sorry, I’d opt for solid rubber. I know there are some killer colorways releasing that use translucent rubber that will be more enticing than some of the offerings that use solid rubber, but (there’s always a but) just keep in mind that if my pair with solid rubber didn’t offer as much bite laterally as it could have, imagine what it’d be like on a “normal” surface and the translucent rubber outsole.

I would not recommend playing in the LeBron 15 Ashes outdoors. Exposed Air units almost always pop once the outsole grinds down to the cushion’s surface and the rubber used here is soft, so it’ll likely happen sooner rather than later.

Beast mode! If you’re a cushion-above-all-else type of player then you’ll love these. The bounce and feedback felt from the Zoom units is incredible. This isn’t the first time this type of cushion has been utilized in a LeBron model (the last time was the LeBron 10) but articulation is present this time around so overall mobility has greatly increased.

Is the setup perfect? While it’s as close as it’s ever been, it still has some issues. Lateral stability — while a bit better than the LBJ10 due to wrapping the front portion of the Air unit in Phylon — could benefit from the implementation of an actual outrigger. I’m not sure why there isn’t a true outrigger on a shoe that rides on a platform made of Air, but that’s what we’ve got to work with here.

If you’re a linear player, like LeBron, then you shouldn’t have many issues with stability and support. However, if you move laterally often then you’ll likely feel the instability and it’ll hinder your on court performance. It caused me to hesitate instead of moving as I normally would around the court.

I believe the tooling could be the cause of LeBron’s recent ankle issues. While he usually sprints from one end of the floor to the other, there are times when he’ll move laterally. The tippy nature of the LeBron 15s tooling will be loud and clear when someone moves laterally in them — and you can see LeBron’s body jerk a bit to recover.

A wider setup or a larger outrigger could likely resolve the issues I’ve been experiencing. I hope we see something on the LeBron 16 that adds lateral stability while retaining all of the awesomeness that is Max Zoom Air.

Battleknit is used here (aka really thick Flyknit) and it feels awesome on-foot. If you were unimpressed with the stiff upper used on the new jordans 2018 and the cheap but soft materials used on the LeBron 14, you may find that the material choice on the LeBron 15 Ashes offers a happy balance between the two.

Some areas of the knit are thicker than others while high wear areas are glued a bit for durability. Once on-foot I felt comfortable and secure, and if you’ve worn Flyknit hoop shoes before you’ll feel the evolution throughout the years.

I went down half size from my true size in the LeBron 15 Ashes due to the materials and build of the upper. One piece uppers can be tricky to get just right and I’d rather have them be a little snug than a bit too loose — especially with the tooling setup the way it is. Trying them on in-store is the best option, and make sure to bring your brace or orthotics with you to ensure everything works.

Lockdown was surprisingly nice from heel to toe. While the lacing structure relies solely on Flywire, it did its job rather well. The top “eyelet” or Flywire cable draws the heel into the rear section of the shoe nicely while additional heel padding takes care of the rest.

Once you’re in the LeBron 15 and laced up, especially if you opt for going down half size, you’ll be locked in and ready to go.

Support in the LeBron 15 is a bit lackluster due to the tooling setup. Traditional support features like a torsional midfoot shank and TPU heel counter are all in place and work well. Hwoever, the midsole and outsole lack a wide enough base and it really hurt the lateral stability and overall support. Again, if you’re a linear player then you should be fine. If you move around laterally then you may have the same experience I had in them.

I love pieces of the LeBron 15 Ashes . Materials and fit are highlights, and the cushion is the best Nike has offered in years. Stability made them a bit concerning for me while on the floor and I never ended up feeling as comfortable as I wanted to be.

If you’re willing to sacrifice lateral stability in lieu of cushion then you’ll enjoy the LeBron 15 Ashes immensely. If you’re a low profile player that roams the floor and curls off screens to get an open look at the basket then you may want something a bit different go to newjordans2018.com

Look at These Nike Lebron 15 Deconstruction Test

We’ve begun testing the Nike LeBron 15 but if you wanted to know all the ins and outs of LeBron James’ latest sneaker then here is a detailed deconstruction by newjordans2018.com.

While I don’t particularly enjoy seeing a perfectly good shoe cut in half when someone less fortunate could have used them, it’s for educational purposes and the findings are usually not mentioned by the brands themselves.

However, this is my favorite look at these deconstruction breakdowns. As a shoe nerd, it’s just really freaking cool to see the shoe and all of its “guts” like this — really freaking cool. The Nike LeBron 15 has been examined top to bottom; every component that makes up the sneaker is carefully deconstructed and dissected.

The tooling is what most tend to focus on because it is the extension of your foot and it can make or break your wearing experience. Are they comfortable? Stable? Supportive? Not only do we test these attributes personally, but it’s nice to actually see what makes up those attributes within the design.

You can see the sockliner/insole and it’s Ortholite. Often, people ask me which OrthoLite is the best or most premium. These light blue ones aren’t it — they’re the cheapest but provide decent step-in comfort. I’ve found that the denser dark blue ones are some of the best, along with the yellow ones. Those offer the most cushion and last the longest.

A popular thing to do nowadays is add a thin foam layer in addition to the typical strobel board. While thin, it does add an extra level of comfort — I know it may be hard to believe, but it’s true. If you were to try on the same shoe but one featured this additional layer while the other did not, you would (or should) feel a small difference between the two. Located under this foam layer is the more traditional strobel. It’s what the upper of the shoe is sewn onto once fit and shaped around whichever last the brand decided to use on the shoe.

Another interesting thing note is that signature shoes are not fitted to a last that is specific to the signature athlete. The athlete’s personal pair is fitted to a custom last, but the retail runs are fitted around lasts that the brand and design teams feel suits the market best.

In Asia brands tend to use a wider last due to wide feet being more common in that part of the world. In the U.S. we can see a variety of lasts used — usually not on the same shoe but spread across different models — that cater to those with normal, narrow, and wide feet. There are even some brands like New Balance that will make one model using different lasts that vary upon widths. You’ll usually see those widths listed when looking for a pair in your size.

A much larger torsional plate is used on the LeBron 15 than what we see in Nike’s lower priced offerings. With the tooling here being so flexible, the added support and coverage is needed to avoid overstraining and foot fatigue.

You can see here that the midsole sculpt is meant to cradle the foot a bit. Something I’ve noticed while testing the sneaker is that this is actually negated by the additional layers like the dual strobel boards and sock liner. The scuplt should have lipped up a bit more to truly cup the foot properly — at least in the lateral forefoot.

However, the shoe still doesn’t ride quite as high as it may look at first glance. This is why I love these breakdowns. You get to truly learn about the footwear that you wear.

The forefoot Zoom unit is roughly 16mm thick. I say roughly because the midsole is still partially attached. But you get the point, it’s a fat Air unit.

It isn’t quite as fat as the midfoot Zoom unit, which is roughly 17mm.

And neither is as fat as the rear Air unit which sits at roughly 19mm thick. Which is really thick for an Air unit — Zoom Air that is. This is why Nike combines Air Max pillars within the Air bladder alongside the Zoom Air’s tensile fibers. At this thickness the heel would be unstable, but the pillars help maintain stability while still allowing the heel’s strike zone to sit directly over the Zoom Air.

The heel has an additional layer of foam injected into the pillars, something we first saw implemented with the Nike LeBron 14. This makes the heel a bit more forgiving upon impact — for those that happen to strike with their heel, of course.

The upper is what Nike calls BattleKnit, aka really thick Flyknit. The layer in between your foot and the Flyknit is there to add some comfort and protection against anything that may be considered rough or unfinished — knots, seams, pressure from the Flywire cables, etc.

This is the inside of the BattleKnit. You can see where things are glued (darker portions) and where things are tightly knitted together (everything else).

Trusting Flywire cables to be your only source of lockdown from the lacing area is risky. So far, it’s been working, but I get more peace of mind when there are more traditional lace holes in addition to Flywire acting as reinforcement rather than the front line.

The heel counter is slimmed down but has been effective so far. It lips and cups the foot better than the forefoot section of the midsole, which you can see below.

That takes care of the Nike LeBron 15 deconstruction. Stay tuned for performance reviews in the coming weeks and let us know what you think about the Nike LeBron  15 so far down below in the comment section. I know some people are currently playing in the ‘Ghost’ colorway so any input you have from your experiences thus far are always appreciated.

Three Style Shoes on Nike LeBron 15 at 2018 hot sale

Coming soon is the Nike LeBron 15 which James will wear during the 2017-18 NBA Season. The debut of LeBron James’ 15th signature shoe will take place during October.

ecently LeBron James was seen wearing the new Cleveland Cavaliers Nike Uniforms but in the caption he wrote “Savage Season 15”. This does mark James’ 15th season in the NBA, but could also be the Nike LeBron 15.

“This is my favorite shoe to date” says James. “The performance benefits and sophisticated look make this shoe a force on and off the court.”

The shoe’s key innovations include a next-generation Nike Flyknit Battle construction that provides strategic stretch, a locked-in fit and durability. Underfoot is a fully articulated cushioning system that combines Max Air and Zoom Air units, while a full-bootie construction offers a secure, one-to-one fit.

“The number-one thing people should know about the LEBRON 15 is that this new Nike Flyknit is something that’s never been done in a performance shoe,” notes James. “It looks great, too. Since Jason and I started working on the LeBron 7, we have always talked about how we not only want to have the top, top, top notch in performance, we want style, as well. We have a desire to create shoes that makes all people feel good when they put it on.”

Update: Below is three style Nike LeBron 15 colorways which includes 2018 releases via newjordans2018.com .

1.Nike LeBron 15 ‘Ghost’ Releases October 17th

nj2018 first showed readers LeBron James fifteenth signature sneaker in the ‘Ghost’ colorway way back in early September. Now, detailed images of this highly anticipated model have surfaced as the 2017-18 NBA season opener is only six days away.

The upper of this particular silhouette features tan Battleknit, an evolved version of Flyknit. The tan leather accents offer some luxe touches to the knitted upper that give the whole shoe a clean look.

The outsole is made of translucent rubber with massive articulated Max Air and Zoom Air units sitting above. The midsole is splashed with white speckles, and the laces get some reflective hits.

According to Sneaker News, the LeBron 15 ‘Ghost’ will launch alongside the LeBron 15 ‘Ashes’ on October 28 for $185.

LeBron’s Cavs will open the new NBA season at home against the Kyrie-led Celtics on October 17 (what a coincidence, we see you Adam Silver). Which colorway of the LeBron 15 will we see the King wear? Let us know your thoughts.

2.Nike LeBron 15 Ashes release at October 28th, 2017

The Nike LeBron 15 ‘Ashes’ will be the first colorway of the Nike LeBron 15 to make a retail release which will take place during October.

This Nike LeBron 15 known as Ashes is highlighted in a Black and White color combination. Using a mixture of the two shades across the uppers, we have Flyknit. In addition we have a Max Air and Zoom Air units and a full bootie construction. Black lands on the liner, laces, and the three heel loops while White covers the midsole with a speckled overlay. Finishing the look is a flame logo on the inside of the tongue.

3.KITH x Nike LeBron 15 ‘Floral’

Not long ago we showed a first look at the Nike LeBron 15 which is LeBron James 15th signature shoe. Now we have a new pair showing up which was on the feet of Maverick Carter and seen on Victor Cruz’s Instagram story.

As you can see, this Nike LeBron 15 features White across the base however the highlight would be the KITH x  Lebron 15 Floral embroidery seen wrapping the uppers. Following we have Gold on the lace tips and White on the rubber outsole. The LeBron 15 is constructed with BattleKnit and BattleMax technology.

Below you can check another image of the Nike LeBron 15 Floral. Tonight you will see LeBron James on the runway for the KITH x Nike Collection so it’s possible we may see another colorway or new images of the Floral. Make sure to visit the comments section and let us know your thoughts on Jordan release date 2018 .